Free and Frugal Homeschool Strewing Ideas that Won’t Break the Bank

At first, strewing can seem like an expensive proposition for a homeschool family. All the games, books, toys, supplies, who can afford so much?

In reality, strewing can be a cost-effective way of homeschooling. All you need is a little time and creativity. 

First, let’s consider curriculum costs. I have six children, and if I purchased a complete box curriculum, that would get somewhat pricey. We’re talking thousands of dollars. Not to mention the guilt I would feel at having spent so much if it turns out we hated it.

However, by not purchasing a boxed curriculum, I free up a lot of funds for strewing. So where do I spend my money and how do I make it go as far as possible.

Homeschool Strewing

This post contains affiliate links, you can read my disclosure here.

Using Community Resources for Strewing

Of course, the first stop for the frugal homeschooler is the library. I’ve often said all you need to homeschool is a pencil, some paper, and a library card. Really.

So how do we use the library?

  • Books, obviously.
  • Audio Books
  • Magazines
  • Movies
  • Storytime, which is all the preschool you need
  • Art, science, and math classes
  • Free passes to the zoo and museums

Our library even has some unique resources such as a 3D printer, yoga, and crochet classes.

But there are other community resources available in addition to the library.

  • Nature centers and parks
  • Free days at museums
  • Historical markers
  • Interesting stores and markets

You can get out and experience so much for free right in your community; you just have to do a little research.

Free and Frugal Homeschool Strewing Ideas

Items to Strew from Thrift Stores and Sales

I love the thrift store, and it provides endless things to strew. You never know what you might discover. What have I found?

  • Books
  • Board Games
  • Toys
  • Primary Bucket Balance Scale
  • Spelling Power task cards
  • CD’s
  • Coffee Table Art Books
  • Cheap small appliances to deconstruct
  • Craft supplies

Why is this so amazing? I would never pay $75 for a Monet coffee table book, but $4 at the thrift store is perfect for my budget and gives us ample, beautiful images to peruse.

Also, look at the items available in a different way.

Could you get clothes for dress up? Perhaps your child likes to sew and could try their hand at upcycling?

Maybe your jewelry maker could repurpose some thrift store jewelry?

A child that likes woodworking might makeover a piece of furniture and sell it for a profit.

I also check out the clearance racks wherever we are. My girls love duct tape, but at almost $5 a roll, that isn’t happening. However, I recently found clearance rolls for $1.50. Much better, I splurged and bought four rolls.

Strewing Options Through Technology

Technology provides so much to the world of strewing. We’ll never make it to Petra, but we wandered through it on Google Earth.

It’s incredible what we have at our fingertips today.

  • Podcasts
  • Online learning sites
  • Audiobooks through the library or a great sale at Audible
  • Live nature cams
  • Endless youtube tutorials
  • Free and inexpensive learning apps
  • Coloring pages, paper dolls, games, puzzles, and maps to download
  • DIY.org

An online search will give us unlimited options for most any idea we have. With enough hunting, you’re sure to find something to strew.

Household Items for Strewing

We all know kids love a box.

So why not keep those boxes for a rainy day of strewing. Recently my 7 and 10-year-olds created an entire world in our upstairs hallway using boxes we had in the garage. We’ve also made play laptops, cell phones, and dollhouses for their different imaginative worlds.

For little ones, you could set out extra blankets and sheets for a fort building day.

If they’re a little older, keep some of those cereal boxes and make art journals, notebooks, or bookmarks. Old magazines would be perfect to include in these projects.

Perhaps they would enjoy some science experiments. You could always set the necessary items out the night before and see if they’re interested. The kitchen and bath are full of opportunities to make a science-related mess.

  • Baking Soda and Vinegar Volcanoes
  • Oobleck made with cornstarch and water
  • Beans and jars to observe sprouting
  • Borax to make crystals or slime
  • Homemade playdoh
  • Celery and food coloring

These are all inexpensive items you would typically have in your house. But what about things outside your home?

Could you go seashell hunting at the beach? Do you live somewhere with a lot of unique rocks? For us, we can have all the pinecones and leaves we want.

Use what is unique to your area of the world and create a nature display.

Keep Strewing Simple

Don’t overthink strewing; the idea is to pique your child’s interest and encourage curiosity.

It doesn’t require expensive games or subscription boxes, though I love both of those. All that is needed is some creativity and a little planning.

It may be something you have stashed away and forgot you ever owned.

Now look in a closet or under a bed for something new to strew in your homeschool.

 

Homeschool strewing

Relaxed Homeschool Strewing

How to Guide of Relaxed Homeschool Strewing

Strewing is one of those vague phrases homeschoolers toss out there and think everyone knows…

interesting homeschool parent

Be an Interesting Homeschooling Parent Who is Interested in the World

Did you know earthworms are hermaphrodites and possess both the male and female sex organs?…

Homeschool Strewing Adding Interest to Life

Homeschool Strewing-Adding Interest to Life

If you only take one idea from unschoolers, this should be the one. Strewing was…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *